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THE CRIME OF WAR February 27, 2012

Posted by wmmbb in Peace.
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The War in Afghan began on October 7, 2001. The war continues as does the occupation by foreign troops, who prop up what is described as the government of the country.

Need it be asked why we are still part of this venture, when for example the Dutch have ceased their involvement. How has violence and atrocity added to the well being of the Afghans, or our well being? So why are we still in Afghanistan, other that to support the American overlords, who on the evidence for the killing are losing?

The clearest reasons are the assumptions about war and a world order constructed from violence. So it is relevant to consider these underpinnings of violence. Camillo “Mac” Bica observes in Truthout:

To those struggling to survive the next improvised explosive device or suicide bomber, war’s negative effects are pervasive and cumulative. Everyday living in a war zone is a netherworld of horror and insanity in which respect for life and for the dignity of humankind loses all meaning. Life amid the violence, death, horror, trauma, anxiety and fatigue of war erodes moral being, undoes character, and reduces decent men and women to savages capable of incredible cruelty that would never have been possible before their having been victimized by and sacrificed to war.

As evidenced by the appalling events in Haditha and Baghdad, and so many others – including the recent atrocity committed when several Marines urinated on the lifeless bodies of Taliban fighters – warriors are dehumanized and desensitized to death and destruction. Judgments of right and wrong – morality – quickly become irrelevant, and cruelty and brutality become a primal response to an overwhelming threat of annihilation. Consequently, atrocities in such an environment are not isolated, aberrant occurrences prosecuted by a few deviant individuals. Rather, they are commonplace, intrinsic to the nature and the reality of war, the inevitable consequence of enduring prolonged, life-threatening and morally untenable conditions, what psychologist Robert Jay Lifton describes as “atrocity-producing situations.”

As George Orwell noted those who promote wars, do not directly participate in their horrors, and in the US nor do their children.

David Swanson in a long speech to a audience of like-mind expounds on the case that war is a moral hell:

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