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LIBYAN WAR TO END? May 27, 2011

Posted by wmmbb in North Africa.
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The Libyan Government based in Tripoli is now prepared to make concessions to end the civil war, and the UN endorsed and Nato aerial bombing campaign designed to save civilians.

Kim Sengupta and Solomon Hughes report:

The Independent has obtained a copy of a letter from the country’s Prime Minister, Al-Baghdadi al-Mahmoudi, being sent to a number of foreign governments. It proposes an immediate ceasefire to be monitored by the United Nations and the African Union, unconditional talks with the opposition, amnesty for both sides in the conflict, and the drafting of a new constitution.

David Cameron and Barack Obama met yesterday to try to find an exit strategy from a conflict increasingly appearing to have no definitive military solution in sight. The US President acknowledged that the allies now seem to face a long, attritional campaign.
. . .
Dr Mahmoudi’s letter stated: “The future Libya will be radically different to the one that existed three months ago. That was always the plan. Only now we may need to accelerate the process. But to do so, we must stop the fighting, start talking, agree on a new constitution and create a system of government that both reflects the reality of our society and conforms to the demands of contemporary governance.

“We must immediately make humanitarian assistance available to all Libyans in need whether they are in Libya or outside. The cycle of violence must be replaced by a cycle of reconciliation. Both sides need the incentive to move out of their corner and to engage in a process that will lead to consensus.”

The Libyan Prime Minister’s initiative follows meetings held with Ban Ki-moon which led to the United Nations Secretary General calling for an “immediate, verifiable ceasefire”. The UN’s special envoy in Libya, Abdel Elah al-Khatib, had discussed specific conditions needed for this with Dr Mahmoudi and a select few regime officials.
. . .
Advocates of military action hold that it is the intensification of attacks which is driving the regime to seek a deal. According to defence officials, more than 1,200 targets have been “degraded” since the start of operations.

“We propose that parliament will convene at an extraordinary session to appoint an executive committee which will manage the public affairs and foresee the ceasefire and propose a mechanism for a political dialogue… comprising representatives from all regions and civil society. A committee will be… mandated with drafting a constitution to the Libyan people for adoption which will define the political system in Libya. A process of reconciliation will be initiated which will include amnesty and compensation to all victims of the conflict. We are ready to talk to help mediate a ceasefire and to initiate discussions on the future form of constitutional government… Let us create a road-map to the future. What has occurred in Libya is part of a wider series of events throughout the Arab world. We understand this. We are ready and we know what is required of us.”

The interesting development here is the role placed by the Secretary-General. How might his actions be explained?

ELSEWHERE:

These questions do not depend on the UN Security Council. Jason Ditz reports that:

White House deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes said the US was absolutely opposed to the ceasefire because the Gadhafi-led government is “not complying with UN demands.” It is so far unclear if other NATO member nations may be more open to the idea.

Libyan Prime Minister Baghdadi Ali Mahmoudi insisted that the offer was sincere and that Libya is “serious about a ceasefire.” He said the offer was to be based on an African Union road map for peace in the nation, which Libyan officials endorsed previously.

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