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SHIADOM AND HIZBULLAH August 21, 2006

Posted by wmmbb in Category to be ascribed.
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I know it is an incorrect coinage.

However, Trudy Rubin, via Common Dreams, does shed some light on the emergence of the Shiite branch of Islam, following the invasion of Iraq, and the fundamental misunderstanding about the nature of Iraq society.

I suppose it would be necessary to start with the treatment of Iran, starting with the assassination of the prime minister in 1953, the imposition of the regime of the Shah, and then the revolution of the Ayotollahs.

The aftermath of the Iraqi Invasion has seen the Persian ascendancy over much of the Mid East based on religious affiliation rather than ethnic identify. Gary Younge’s article in The Guardian about multiple identities which he suggest we all have is relevant, and the role of fundamentalists in asserting that one chosen identity should override all others.

(Whenever I make comments about matters related to ethnicity, I have cannot but observe that I live in a lower class Anglo enclave, predominantly of homeowners. That clearly is part of my identity, but it is not the sum total of who or what I am. The construction of “us”and the inherent differences can be forged, so it is suggested by the politics of fear as in Don Arthur’s review of Carmen Lawrence’s book launch at Troppo.)

And it seems that the poor South Lebanon Shiite population has been the beneficiaries of the wave of change triggered by the invasion and occupation of Iraq, not least in the emergence and development of Hizbullah, which paradoxically may well increase their share and stake in the Lebanese state. So in this instance, democracy might triumph, although not before Israel has something to say and again put its spoon into the Lebanese melting pot.

Now here is an alternative explanation as to the foundation and patronage of Hizbullah suggested by Uri Avenery writing in CounterPunch:

Hizbullah grew up with the support of Syria, which controlled Lebanon at the time. Hafez al-Assad saw the return of the Golan to Syria as the aim of his life – after all, it was he who lost them in the June 1967 war, and who did not succeed in getting them back in the October 1973 war. He did not want to risk another war on the Israel-Syria border, which is so close to Damascus. Therefore, he patronized Hizbullah, so as to convince Israel that it would have no quiet as long as it refused to give the Golan back. Assad jr. is continuing with his fathers legacy. Without the cooperation of Syria, Iran has no direct way of supplying Hizbullah with arms.

And goes on to observe:

The solution is on hand: we have to remove the settlers from there, whatever the cost in wines and mineral water, and give the Golan back to its rightful owners. Ehud Barak almost did so, but, as is his wont, lost his nerve at the last moment.

In addition he makes reference to the situation in Gaza and the West Bank, including Jerusalem.

I get the impression that if some outside body does not suggest to them to stop, the Israelis are just digging the hole deeper and deeper until as William Lind suggests they suffer the fate of the Crusader states.

Am I right in believing that terrorism has grown out of the Authoritarian regimes of the Middle East and the unresolved Palestinian conflict, which is then used as a model for other continuing conflicts, such as Kashmir? The resolving of the Palestinian conflict would go a long war to solving the problem of terrorism, which is likely to be recurrent in the absence of global grievance process and system of international law replacing the doctrine that might is right.

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